This site uses cookies and by using the site you are consenting to this. Find out why we use cookies and how to manage your settings.
     

Change text size : a a a

    Search the site:

Ballet Hoo! index



Countdown to the performance

Project timeline

Programme 1 summary
Programme 2 summary
Programme 3 summary
Programme 4 summary

Meet the Birmingham Royal Ballet team
Meet the participants

What the project has meant to me

A day in the life...

The story of the ballet
How you can get involved with dance
Birmingham Royal Ballet's project partners

Press and media coverage of the project



Click here if you would like to support BRB's work in the community

Countdown...

34 days to go

34 minutes is the running time of the second act of BRB's production of Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo and Juliet is a three-act ballet. The second act is the shortest at 34 minutes, the first is 59 minutes and the third 40 minutes. All the great classical ballets are similar full-evening works. For example, Swan Lake has four acts, The Sleeping Beauty a prologue and three acts and The Nutcracker two acts.

Some ballets are extremely short, and normally form part of a gala or evening of divertissements (a collection of short ballets or excerpts from ballets). However, most evenings of ballet that are not full-length include two or three shorter (one-act) ballets. These allow an audience to see several contrasting ballets in one evening. These shorter ballets are roughly the same length as a single act of a full-length ballet.

BRB often performs a mixed bill of three one-act ballets alongside a full-length ballet. For example, Romeo and Juliet is touring in autumn 2006 alongside a programme of Apollo, an early ballet by the famous 20th-century choreography George Balanchine; it features only four main dancers with a few subsiduary roles. Pulcinella a comedy, has a slightly larger cast, much more light-hearted music, and the choreography is newly created for BRB by Kim Brandstrup, and The Firebird, one of the most famous one-act ballets from the early 20th century, which features a huge cast. It involves most of BRB's company, additional dance students and 36 extras, who are non-dancing actors brought in specially. It is quite a spectacle!

Another good example of a strongly contrasting mixed bill is to be found in BRB's summer 2007 season. Oliver Hindle's sports-inspired ballet The Four Seasons, danced to 300-year-old music is performed alongside Twyla Tharp's ballroom-influenced Nine Sinatra Songs, danced to Frank Sinatra, and John Cranko's 1950s comedy ballet, Pineapple Poll, which is danced to tunes taken from Gilbert and Sullivan operas. Quite a contrast! This is being performed alongside the three-act, full-length ballet, Coppélia.

To see what else BRB is performing this year, click here



Countdown



18

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

  Contact Us | Legal Statements | Credits