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Countdown...

28 days to go

On 28 June 1928, George Balanchine’s ballet Apollo, which BRB is performing during its autumn tour this year, was premiered at the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt in Paris.

Apollo is a very important piece in the history of 20th-century ballet. It was the first time that the choreographer George Balanchine and composer Igor Stravinsky worked together. Their collaboration became one of the most important in the ballet world of the last century. BRB are celebrating the work of Igor Stravinsky in Birmingham and on tour. Click here for more details of 'Stravinsky! A Celebration'.

The ballet itself concerns the life of Apollo, the son of Zeus and god of the sun, and his encounters with three of the nine muses, the Greek goddesses who preside over the arts and sciences. Calliope is the muse of poetry, Polyhymnia the muse of song and Terpsichore the muse of dance. At the end he leads all three up to Parnassus, a great mountain in Greece, where he is said to have held court. Click on the thumbnails below to see some photos of Apollo and the muses:



BRB has many Balanchine ballets in its repertory including Apollo, Agon, Prodigal Son (composed by Sergei Prokofiev, the composer of Romeo and Juliet), Concerto barocco, Symphony in Three Movements and Stravinsky Violin Concerto. Click on the thumbnails below to see some pictures of Symphony in Three Movements



and Agon



Symphony in Three Movements and Agon are both examples of pure-dance, or abstract ballets, that have no story, but seek to thrill or move their audience with the beauty or virtuosity of the dance. Both are also being performed by BRB in early 2007. Click here for details.

To find out about the life of George Balanchine and how he defected from communist Russia, click here.



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